Scam Arrest Warrants – United States District Court

Scam arrest warrants are being sent by fax and email purportedly from the United States District Court, which could include the Bankruptcy Court.  Please see the notice and information below that was distributed by the United States Courts.  The notice details the scam practices and who to contact if you have received any of these bogus arrest warrants.

Warning! Arrest Warrant Scam

You’ve received a warrant by fax or email saying a federal law enforcement officer or an attorney for the government wants to arrest you. Charges may be for money laundering or bank fraud, or missed jury duty. To avoid arrest, the warrant says, send money.

It’s a scam.

The warrants may display a bogus logo of an unspecified “United States District Court,” a case number, and various charges. Typically, recipients are instructed to call a number to get a “settlement” or to wire money to avoid arrest.

The warrant is phony. A valid warrant would not be served by fax or e-mail. It would be served in person by a U.S. Marshal or other law enforcement officer.

Anyone receiving a fake arrest warrant should contact the FBI or the district U.S. Marshals Office. If there is any question regarding the authenticity of a warrant, contact your district clerk of court.

The fake arrest warrants have been reported across the country, including in the District Courts for the Southern District of Ohio, Southern District of Illinois, New Mexico, Western District of Kentucky, Utah, the District of Columbia, and throughout Florida. Anyone demanding or obtaining money or anything of value while impersonating an officer or employee of the United States may be fined and/or imprisoned up to three years.

SHOULD I HIRE A BANKRUPTCY ATTORNEY OR BANKRUPTCY PETITION PREPARER

As a general rule of thumb, if you are planning to file for bankruptcy protection you should hire an experienced bankruptcy attorney. You can hire a bankruptcy petition preparer or do it yourself, but these two options generally may not save you money in the long run and the experience may not be pleasant.

Filing a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy is not an easy task. My Chapter 7 case filings average about 50 pages in length. They contain a tremendous amount of information. But filing alone is not the end of the process. Provided that all of the required documents are filed, you still have to send copies of certain information to the Chapter 7 Trustee by a specific date. You are required to appear at the Bankruptcy Court for your Section 341 Meeting of Creditors, which is where the Chapter 7 Trustee will question you about the information filed. Even if all goes well, you still may need to file additional documents before you receive your discharge.

WHAT COULD GO WRONG

Whether you proceed on your own or hire a bankruptcy petition preparer, chances are that something will go wrong.
I witnessed “something going wrong” today during a Section 341 Meeting of Creditors at the Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Ohio. The debtor had hired a bankruptcy petition preparer. They paid the BPP $650.00. What the debtor got was the three page Petition and the two page Exhibit D. That’s about 1/10 of the required documents for $650.00. The debtor had to take her papers to the Bankruptcy Court and file them herself. When she got to the Section 341 Meeting, she had no-one there to help her when the trustee started asking questions. (I do commend the trustee in this case who was extremely courteous). Although the Chapter 7 trustee and the Assistant U.S. Trustee were trying to get this lady back on track, it is hard to say what will happen. The meeting of creditors will probably be rescheduled, causing her to come back to court again. It is also possible that her case will be dismissed.

And, the she still owes the Bankruptcy Court $306.00 for the filing fee.

YOU COULD LOSE YOUR PROPERTY

Keep in mind that the Chapter 7 Trustee works for your creditors. Her job is to find assets of yours that can be liquidated and paid to your creditors. Fortunately for Ohio debtors, you get to keep most if not all of your stuff. There are limits however, and I have had many clients with exposed assets. Because they hired an attorney they were aware of the risks before the case was filed.
So, the very minute you file for protection under Chapter 7, the trustee is theoretically in control of all of your assets. The Chapter 7 Trustee has a lot of power, and remember she works for your creditors. Her job is to find assets for your creditors. She is not interested in protecting you.

If you have assets that cannot be protected or you fail to assert your protection, and you file Chapter 7, the trustee is going to take your stuff. Well, maybe not everything, but things of value like cars, cash, and your home.

YOU MAY NOT GET A CHAPTER 7 DISCHARGE

As I mentioned earlier, if you don’t file all of the required documents and/or fulfill your duties, your case could be dismissed. You don’t get a discharge of your debts if your case is dismissed.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Hire an experienced bankruptcy attorney. One that will explain the bankruptcy process and answer your questions. Hire an attorney you can trust, someone that will be with you when you meet the Chapter 7 Trustee at the meeting of creditors. If you want to reduce the headaches and frustrations and get a fresh start, you should hire a bankruptcy attorney.